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Shortlist - Student Award

Student 

Richard Lundy - WINNER

Jessica Ilunga

(Shortlisted)

Michael Brooke

(Shortlisted)

Eleanor Rawsthorne

(Shortlisted)

 

 

Winner - Richard Lundy

(Cardiff University - School of Geography and Planning)

Entry title

Incompatible Imagery: The conflict between heritage and development at Liverpool Waters.

Abstract

The research examines the conflict between heritage and development in the context of a UNESCO World Heritage site (WHS). Post-industrial cities frequently try to reinvent themselves with a new city image. However historical assets such as listed buildings or conservation areas can seemingly restrict development. At Liverpool Waters this conflict has reached a climax with UNESCO threatening to remove Liverpool's status as a WHS. This research investigates the proposed image why it is problematic for UNESCO and what development is possible in the context of heritage. A visual analysis of Liverpool Waters identifies a hegemonic motif symbolising economic prosperity apparent in the design and highlights how its presentation can exacerbate concerns of heritage professionals. Interviews with office tenants suggest that the exterior design of the building is of low importance and therefore this motif's significance lies elsewhere. Finally interviews with heritage professionals indicate that the design especially the building height is not responsive to the context nor sympathetic to the heritage. Heritage professionals explain that development is possible amongst heritage if it is sympathetic in design. The dissertation recommends an independent design review panel be established in Liverpool to audit new developments and ensure they fit well into their surroundings. Specific to Liverpool Waters it recommends that the developers forego the full realisation of the motif and scale back the design to meet UNESCO's restrictions. Overall, this publication contributes to current heritage management research by clarifying how development is acceptable in a heritage context particularly in relation to tall buildings.

Motivation

"The judges recognised the overall quality, clarity and relevance of the paper, and they were particularly impressed with the breadth of the supporting literature mobilised by the author "

 

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Shortlisted - Michael Brooke

(University of Cape Town – School of Architecture Planning and Geomatics)

Entry title

The InterCHANGE|FACE - Understanding the role of the Interchange in the Local Urban Environment.

Abstract

Cape Town like many cities is facing significant mobility-related challenges. Intermodality where multiple modes of transport make up each trip is considered key to addressing these issues. The point of changeover the Public Transport Interchange (PTI) becomes crucial. In South Africa there is a distinct lack of clarity with limited literature and no recent guidelines regarding the role and performance of PTIs. This research provides an overview of the role of PTIs in Cape Town focusing specifically on the interface between the interchange and its surrounding local urban environment. To achieve this an Analysis Framework was developed: a comprehensive inventory of various indicators or assessment criteria that can be used to create a benchmark for an interchange under study. The Framework includes both quantitative and qualitative factors ranging from digital modelling to on-site observational analysis and interviews. The Framework evaluates an interchange across scales addressing issues from micro-level design to an interchange's position in the greater transport network. This approach illustrates the potential to incorporate multiple tools and measures from different disciplines into a cohesive and usable format. The Framework provides an objective evidence-based approach in order to better understand the overall performance of a PTI and guide proposed policy and design interventions. Through the application of the Framework to a case study the research illustrates how small strategic interventions can make the difference between an interchange performing well or failing. This study emphasises the importance of a user-focused approach and provides the basis for achieving well-designed and integrated PTIs.

Motivation

"The judges appreciated the relevance of the theme treated, the methodological appropriateness, and the clarity of the style"

 

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Shortlisted - Jessica Ilunga

(University of Cape Town – School of Architecture Planning and Geomatics)

Entry title

The role of radical planning in urban justice: Bridging the gap between formal and substantive rights of citizens in Cape Town.

Abstract

The tension between neoliberal democracy and urbanization in South Africa has created growing social movements who use their formal rights to advance their campaigns for substantive rights. In planning literature the most 'radical' social movements are best known due to their more overt displays of public anger and mass demonstrations. However the lesser-known community-based organisations that are seemingly 'less radical' nevertheless also contribute towards facilitating greater equity and spatial justice. This dissertation assesses Open Streets Cape Town as one of these 'less radical' organisations and its impact on the built environment through its more ephemeral modes of campaigning. I develop a theoretical framework based on the concept of 'radical planning' to establish criteria for citizen-led interventions opposing urban injustice. The research also includes Susan Fainstein's (2010) concept of the 'just city' to establish criteria for spatial justice. As such the twofold main research question asks: What are the roles and impacts of 'less radical' community-based organisations in Cape Town? And how do these organisations address the disjuncture between formal and substantive rights by facilitating projects for equity and spatial justice? The research makes use of the case study and discourse analysis methods to answer this question. The research techniques used are non-participant observation individual semi-structured interview and group interview. The focus is on capturing the views and experiences of the citizen-led movement in Cape Town. The research findings indicate that through its campaign the organisation provides visibility of non-motorised road users and encourages appropriation of streets as public space for all.

Motivation

"The judges appreciated the paper methodological soundness and its sound grounding in academic literature, as well as the actuality of the issue addressed by the research"

 

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Shortlisted - Eleanor Rawsthorne

(University of Liverpool – School of Environmental Sciences)

Entry title

The impact of changing housing need calculations on housing delivery in Local Planning Authorities: an English case study.

Abstract

The government has been attempting to solve the housing crisis in the UK since the release of the Housing White Paper in 2017. One of the proposed initiatives is to improve the Local Plan making process for Local Planning Authorities (LPA) in England. Attempting to speed up the plan making process to ensure LPAs have up to date plans a Standard Methodology (SM) for calculating housing need was proposed. The SM uses affordability ratios and household projections specific to the LPA. When this was first proposed 2014 household projections were used due to these being the latest figures. However when recent household projections were released in September 2018 these figures produced significantly lower housing need numbers for LPAs compared to the 2014 projections. Despite the SM being an attempt to produce 300000 homes per year by 2030 the figures did not add up to this goal. This research explores the effect the SM may be having on housing delivery from the perspective of LPAs across England. Whilst this did not provide a clear-cut answer it provides a platform for further work and is a provisional analysis of the SM. No research seems to have been conducted around the SM. It also highlights the uniqueness of housing markets across the country and has brought concepts to light that I did not think would have emerged from this study.

Motivation

"The judges were impressed by the relevance of the theme treated by research to the practice of planning and by the potential impacts it could have. They also appreciated the methodological rigour of the paper"

 

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