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Shortlist - Early Career Researcher Award

Early Career Researcher

  Guibo Sun - WINNER AND COMMENDED (Best overall score)

Sarah Bissett Scott

(Shortlisted)

Edward Shepherd

(Shortlisted)

Tianren Yang

(Shortlisted)

  Philipp Horn

(Commended - Best marked non-shortlisted paper)

 

 

 

Winner and Commended - Guibo Sun

(Hong Kong University - Department of Urban Planning & Design, Faculty of Architecture)

Entry title

Abstract

The purpose of the paper is to investigate how a three-dimensional pedestrian network reshapes connectivity and helps to integrate the built environment of high-density cities. Using the case of Hong Kong, first, we elaborate how a continuous three-dimensional network constitutes an entirely different urban morphological spatial hierarchy compared to two-dimensional because of the footbridge system, underground connected with metro stations, and paths connected with mall developments. Second, we construct a three-dimensional pedestrian network model classifying segments into 23 categories with multi-height levels (e.g. sidewalk, footbridge, underground, crosswalk, ramp, paths on the building roof). Then we map the three-dimensional network for Hong Kong territory in a geographic information system, finding that the three-dimensional pedestrian network is 2.4 times in length and 8.5 times in link size greater than the road network. Connectivity comparison through a ‘betweenness’ measure found striking differences between the two networks and indicated that footbridges and underground links could enhance walkability when they are well connected with the ground-level networks. Since road networks are widely used as a proxy for pedestrian analysis, we suggest that active travel optimisation planning, especially in high-density cities, requires a bespoke three-dimensional pedestrian model. The three-dimensional pedestrian network, enabling multi-level city living in a vertical metropolis, is a fundamental consideration in urban planning and design practices for high-density cities.

Motivation

"The judges recognised the outstanding nature of this paper. They commended it for its originality, methodological innovation and depth of the literature review, and judged that its findings can have a certain impact"

 

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Shortlisted - Sarah Bissett Scott

(Anglia Ruskin University)

Entry title

Bissett Scott, S. (2018) Spatial Justice’: towards a values-led framework of regeneration outcomes in UK Planning. DPS Thesis. Anglia Ruskin University.

Abstract

This thesis researches ‘spatial justice’ through measured outcomes. It contributes significantly to planning policy and practice by cross-referencing Liberalism’s values of ‘justice as fairness’ with regeneration vision and results. An extensive literature review confirms the lack of evaluative practice for calibrating social justice in spatial terms. Based in a case study of Colville-Tavistock (North Kensington) over four decades (1976-2016) the research evidences professional judgment in planning as a critical success factor. Indicators tested include air quality longevity and housing affordability as measures of environmental impact. Cultural and social impacts on space are tested by examining measures of voter participation and educational attainment. Conclusions recommend: (i) adequate training for professionals in translating ethical values in strategic spatial decision-making; (ii) transparency in how judgment is exercised and by whom; (iii) increased explicitness of ethical values for guiding spatial interventions for strategic planners and politicians - custodians of the process for achieving defined values; (iv) better data selection collection and management for advancing an understanding of spatial consequences from technological changes; (v) a values-led lens to (further) empower communities in improving outcomes from investments in their area; and (vi) local autonomy on place-led decisions supported by accountable strategic institutions to mediate at city-region and regional levels. Viewing ‘spatial justice’ through the lens of a Values-led Impact Analysis (VIA) relates indicators of spatial change through the filter of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and provides a ‘kite-mark’ for a quality standard of justice outcomes in spatial interventions: a prime tool for long-term planning direction.

Motivation

"The judges praised the overall level of the research, with a special mention on the thoroughness of the literature mobilised by it "

 

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Shortlisted - Edward Shepherd

(University of Reading – Real Estate & Planning, Henley Business School)

Entry title

Shepherd, E. (2018) ‘Liberty, property and the state: The ideology of the institution of English town and country planning’, Progress in Planning.

Abstract

Ideologically driven adjustments to planning are a current and relevant concern to practitioners and academics. The paper develops the concept of ideology in to an analytical tool to help explain the institutional dynamism which is a key characteristic of English planning. While there has been much background discussion of ideology in the academic literature there have been few attempts to bring ideology to the forefront of analysis. The paper explores the various methodological approaches to ideology and selects and adapts the ‘morphological’ approach which is best suited to exploring the research problem. The research is therefore original in developing a theory of the relationship between ideologies and institutional change in planning which is systematic and capable of supporting rigorous empirical analysis. The result is a sophisticated account rich in theory as well as in empirical detail which is of use to practitioners and academics in understanding the political ideological dimension of some key changes to national English planning in the 20th and 21st centuries. The conclusions contribute to improving understanding of the relationship between political ideology and planning. The impact of the paper derives from its furthering of planning theory through the development and clarification of the role of political ideology in planning policy change.

Motivation

"The judges recognise the overall value of the research, and point out the excellent intellectual rigour and critical awareness"

 

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Shortlisted - Tianren Yang

(University of Cambridge – Department of Architecture/St John’s College)

Entry title

Yang, T. et al. (2019) ‘Understanding urban sub-centers with heterogeneity in agglomeration economies—Where do emerging commercial establishments locate?’, Cities, 86, pp. 25–36.

Abstract

This paper investigates the formation of employment sub-centres from a new perspective of heterogeneity in agglomeration economies. Using highly granular commercial and residential land-use data (2001–2011) in Chicago, we measure how the locations of jobs, population, quality-of-life amenities, and transportation networks shape specific and heterogeneous sub-centres. First, the results suggest that the CBD as it was traditionally defined is no longer the primary source of agglomeration externalities for the new economic sectors; sub-centres with sector-specific positive agglomeration externalities have stronger correlations with new commercial establishments. Secondly, residents appear to give the highest weight to quality-of-life amenities in choosing where to live. Both trends imply dis-incentives for CBD agglomeration. These findings connect the heterogeneous
production theories with land use planning and urban design, through new empirical insights into how urban sub-centres grow. Furthermore, we put forward a method for forecasting of future sub-centre growth through measuring changes in the probability of commercial development, and discuss its practical implications for planning and design in Chicago.

Motivation

"The judges praised the exceptional methodological soundness and critical awareness of this research, drawing on an in-depth knowledge of the topic"

 

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Shortlisted - Philipp Horn

(University of Sheffield – Urban Studies and Planning)

Entry title

Horn, P. (2019) Indigenous Rights to the City: Ethnicity and Urban Planning in Bolivia and Ecuador. Abingdon (UK); New York, NY (US): Routledge.

Abstract

This book breaks new ground in understandings of indigeneity in urban planning. It offers an empirical contextualisation of concepts such as the right to the city indigenous planning and planning for diversity. It is the first comprehensive and comparative study which establishes how planning for urban indigeneity looks in practice in progressive settings such as Bolivia and Ecuador where the rights of urban indigenous peoples are recognised within constitutions. The book uncovers a set of conflicting realities of urban indigeneity as category of lived experience and planning. It is argued that in their everyday lives residents who self-identify as indigenous express multiple and sometimes contradictory understandings of indigeneity leading them to articulate different rights-based claims. Variations in understandings of indigeneity are explained through an analysis of age gender class and power differences within and between heterogeneous urban indigenous communities. The fact that urban indigeneity means different things to different people makes it difficult for planners to come up with one coherent approach. The book however also reveals that planners fail to address indigenous rights in cities for a variety of other reasons. For example planners often follow distinct priorities and remain guided by colonial logics leading them to consider the urban as non-indigenous white and modern place in which collective indigenous rights are subordinated to individual rights. Building on these findings the book concludes by proposing an intersectional and decolonial approach to urban indigenous planning which embraces conflict between different actors operating within indigenous communities and urban governance.

Motivation

"The judges praised the Dr Horn's knowledgeable contribution and recognised the wide impact the book can have."

 

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