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SEP
19

Planning for an Ageing Population

Planning's Role in Improving Life for an Ageing Population

Date:
Thursday, 19 September 2013 at 9:30AM - 4:30PM
Venue:
Hughes Hall College, Cambridge, CB1 2EW, UK
Price:
£90+VAT (RTPI Members, CIH and RHG Members), £105+VAT (non-members)
Organiser:
RTPI East of England
eastofengland@rtpi.org.uk

Download programme - click this link for a detailed programme of speakers

Download emailable booking form - click this link for an emailable booking form

 

The aim of this conference is to take a broad view of the needs of people as they age. There can be the temptation to think primarily about housing needs but there are many other dimensions to life as an ageing person, so it will include speakers on mobility and transport as well as health and social care.

We were keen to seek views of experts from both inside and outside the East of England. To this end, John Lett from the GLA will give us the London perspective and it is anticipated that we can all benefit from knowledge of the work that has been done there and the resources they have been able to apply to this issue. Professor Roger Mackett from UCL was recommended by Age Concern and has done extensive research around issues related to mobility. Kathleen Dunmore of Three Dragons for Retirement Housing Group has wide experience of addressing older peoples’ housing needs across the country and Celia Atherton of the Dartington Hall Trust will speak about a highly innovative project that takes a holistic view of older peoples’ need for housing and integrating them into the wider community.

Of equal importance will be the speakers from the East of England providing local expertise and knowledge, and we are looking to them to put some flesh on the local context.